Questions When Appealing a College Dismissal

It has taken you a lot of hard work to get into medical school. And if you have been dismissed from the school, you do not know the reason clearly, then you might feel that it is not fair. But you should know that the school can not form a final appeal without giving you time to present your side of the story. The school must make sure they have gone through all the alternatives, then dismiss you. However, you have the right to fight for yourself and appeal dismissal from medical school. Here are a few things that you must know if you are sinking deep into such a situation.

The Process of the Appeal

If you want to appeal for dismissal from a medical school, you should be prepared with evidence to support yourself. You can not claim the decision was unfair if you do not have valid evidence to back you up. To appeal for dismissal you need to write to the Department Chair stating why the decision of dismissal was wrong. On receiving the written appeal, the Department Chair will call an in-house meeting to discuss your case. You might also be interviewed before the house comes to any final decision. Once they have made the decision, you will be informed by the house in the form of a letter. 

If you are facing issues with your grades, apple the Dean of the Medical School or the Academic Appeal Committee. 

The Working of Appeal Review

During the entire course of the appeal process, the student will keep receiving notifications about the advancement of the case. If the apples have something to do with the dismissal, a student can inform the Associate Dean of Students’ Affairs about their wish to appeal for dismissal. The student needs to do this by writing to the Associate Dean within several days after they have been notified about the dismissal. After reviewing the appeal the dean will:

  • Accept the student’s appeal if they consider that the dismissal has some procedural errors. In these cases, the Dean initiates a mechanism of redness.
  • Reject the student’s appeal if they think that nothing could be done and the student lacks evidence to support them.
  • Form an Appeal Committee, in this committee, the student will get a chance to advocate for themselves or will be represented by an advocate. 

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